Provincial Curricula

Want to carry out an educational activity in compliance with official curricula? Find all the science and plant biodiversity-related learning outcomes in K-12 curricula, nationwide and in your province.

Pan-Canadian Pan-Canadian:
Pan-Canadian Protocol for Collaboration on School Curriculum: http://www.cmec.ca/science/framework/index.htm

  • Grade K-3
    • Learning Outcomes
      http://www.cmec.ca/science/framework/pages/english/B-Kto3.html
    • Plant Biodiversity Related Outcomes
      Specific learning outcomes for STSE, skills and knowledge identify what students are expected to know and be able to do for each grade, from Kindergarten to grade 10. For grades 11 and 12, the specific learning outcomes are only stated for the end of grade 12.

      Please note: In grades K – 3, STSE and knowledge are combined as STSE / Knowledge. Otherwise, STSE is referred to as the nature of science and technology.

      The following represents the specific learning outcomes that pertain to biodiversity and plant conservation from grades K – 12.


        Kindergarten Specific Learning Outcomes

          Unit:
          Exploring the World with our Senses

          STSE/Knowledge:

          100-1
          Develop vocabulary and use language to bring meaning to what is seen, felt, smelled, heard, tasted, and thought (e.g., observe and describe their sensory experiences with living things; observe and describe similarities and differences in living things).

          100-3
          Detect consistency and pattern in objects and events and use knowledge to describe these patterns (e.g., explore sound patterns through listening, singing and speaking activities; explore visual patterns by observing their surroundings; recognize patterns that are found in recurring events and in ways that things change).

          101-1
          Explore how characteristics of materials may change as a result of manipulating them (e.g., initiate and describe actions that involve moving, mixing and manipulating materials; observe and describe in general terms changes in size, shape and number and characteristics of the parts).

          103-1
          Choose materials to build a variety of real and imaginary settings, and play roles that correspond to these settings (e.g., create real and imaginary settings using manipulative and tactile materials, and play roles appropriate to those settings by, for example, miming animals).

          Skills:

          Initiating and planning:

          200-1
          Ask questions that lead to exploration and investigation (e.g., ask questions about how plants grow).

          200-4
          Select and use materials to carry out their own explorations (e.g., try different ways to make seeds grow).

          Performing and Recording:

          201-1
          follow a simple procedure where instructions are given one step at a time (e.g., follow step-by-step a set of instructions for moving a model dog in and around a doll house).

          201-2
          manipulate materials purposefully (e.g., use boards and blocks to make a model).

          201-4
          observe, using one or a combination of the senses (e.g., describe a mystery object they can feel but not see).


          Analyzing and Interpreting:

          202-1
          use personal observations when asked to describe characteristics of materials and objects studied (e.g., describe materials they used in making a model).

          202-2
          place materials and objects in a sequence or in groups according to one or more attributes (e.g., arrange a set of toys from largest to smallest).


          Communication and Teamwork:

          203-1
          communicate questions, ideas, and intentions while conducting their explorations (e.g., indicate a problem encountered in a building task).

          203-2
          identify common objects and events, using terminology and language that others understand (e.g., describe an encounter between two animals).

          203-4
          respond to the ideas and actions of others and acknowledge their ideas and contributions (e.g., use building materials offered by another student in making a model).



        Grade One Specific Learning Outcomes

          Unit(s):
          Life Science: Needs and Characteristics of Living Things
          Physical Science: Properties of Objects and Materials
          Materials and Our Senses
          Earth and Space Science: Daily and Seasonal Changes


          STSE/Knowledge:

          100-4
          Observe and identify similarities and differences in the needs of living things (e.g., observe living things through direct experience and visual media, and identify similarities and differences in their needs for food, water, and particular habitats; compare their own needs to those of other animals).

          100-5
          Describe different ways that plants and animals meet their needs (e.g., describe ways that different animals adapt to changes in temperature; describe homes and habitats of some local plants and animals; identify similarities and differences in the ways different animals get their food and protect themselves from danger).

          100-6
          Describe ways that humans use their knowledge of living things in meeting their own needs and the needs of plants and animals (e.g., describe methods, materials and tools used in caring for plants and animals; identify local animals and plants that are normally raised by humans and those that are not).

          100-7
          Describe the different ways that humans and other living things move to meet their needs (e.g., describe how birds use their wings to fly in order to catch insects; describe ways that people adapt to physical challenges through learning, use of technology, and support of the community).

          100-8
          Identify and describe some common characteristics of humans and other animals, and identify variations that make each person and animal unique (e.g., describe ways in which animals are similar to and different from their parents).

          100-9
          Identify each of the senses and demonstrate how each one helps us to recognize, describe, and safely use a variety of materials (e.g., describe how color and smell help them recognize whether fruit is healthy or bruised, ripe or overripe)

          100-10
          Identify attributes of materials that we can learn to recognize through each of our senses (e.g., compare sounds using words such as loud or soft; describe tastes as sweet, sour, salty, bitter; compare textures using words such as hard or soft, smooth or rough, sticky or not sticky; describe appearance in terms of shape, color and luster).

          101-4
          Describe ways in which materials can be changed to alter their appearance and texture (e.g., describe ways to obtain a particular shade or color by mixing two or more paints).

          102-1
          Create a product that is functional and aesthetically pleasing to the user by safely selecting, combining, and modifying materials (e.g., make a flower pot or decorate seed packets).

          102-3
          Observe and describe changes in sunlight and describe how these changes affect living things (e.g., observe and describe the location of the sun in the sky at different times of the day; describe changes from day to night and how these changes affect living things – movement of plants).

          102-4
          Investigate and describe changes that occur on a daily basis in the characteristics, behaviors, and location of living things (e.g., describe changes in their own activity and location during a school day; describe daily changes in the activity and location of a familiar plant or animal).

          102-5
          Investigate and describe changes that occur in seasonal cycles in the characteristics, behaviors, and location of living things (e.g., describe changes in plants that occur during the fall; identify seeds and other structures that give rise to new growth in the spring; describe seasonal changes in the activity and location of animals).

          103-2
          Recognize that humans and other living things depend on the environment, and identify personal actions that can contribute to a healthy environment (e.g., describe how the environment – both indoor and outdoor- is important to their well-being; describe ways that humans might help or harm other living things).

          Skills:

          Initiating and Planning:

          200-1
          Ask questions that lead to exploration and investigation (e.g., ask questions about the shape of plants and how they move; where do animals go for the night).

          200-3
          Make predictions based on observed pattern (e.g., predict that movements of an animal based on previous observations or how plants will grow; predict that some animals will migrate at particular times of the year; predict that some plants will die back to the ground after they flower).

          200-4
          Select and use materials to carry out their own explorations.

          Performing and Recording:

          201-1
          Follow a simple procedure where instructions are given one step at a time

          201-5
          Make and record relevant observations and measurements, using written language, pictures, and charts (e.g., record the growth measurement for plants; make a chart recording the number of birds that came to a feeder on different days; record the amount of food waste deposited in a vermicomposter in one day or one week).

          201-7
          Identify and use a variety of sources of science information and ideas (e.g., use picture books, models, and observations of animals and plants in the local area).

          201-8
          Follow given safety procedures and rules and explain why they are needed (e.g., safety procedures when going on a nature hike).

          Analyzing and Interpreting:

          202-2
          Place materials and objects in a sequence or in groups according to one or more attributes (e.g., group a series of picture of plants from seed to mature plant or a series of pictures of animals by the number of legs they have or by whether or not they have wings; group pictures of plants according to season).

          202-7
          Propose an answer to an initial question or problem and draw simple conclusions based on observations or research (e.g., indicate that plants will grow when provided with water, soil, sunlight, etc; describe some places where animals are found in winter).

          202-9
          Identify new questions that arise from what was learned (e.g., ask why some insects can walk up walls or walk on water or why some plants need certain soil types; ask how animals or plants survive the cold).

          Communication and Teamwork:

          203-1
          Communicate questions, ideas, and intentions while conducting their explorations (e.g., share ideas about how animals and plants survive at different times of the year).

          203-2
          Identify common objects and events, using terminology and language that others understand (e.g., use words such as body, legs, wings, and feelers to describe parts of an insect; or seed, seedling, and adult to describe the life stages of a plant; use vocabulary such as buds, flowers, seeds, and leaves to identify seasonal changes in plants).

          203-3
          Communicate procedures and results, using drawings, demonstrations and written and oral descriptions (e.g., illustrate the growth pattern of a plant).

          203-4
          Respond to the ideas and actions of others in constructing their own understanding (e.g., listen and respond to another student’s description of a plant or animal).


        Grade Two Specific Learning Outcomes

          Unit(s):
          Life Science: Animal Growth and Changes
          Earth and Space Science: Air and Water in the Environment


          STSE/Knowledge:

          100-15
          Compare the life cycle of familiar animals and classify them according to the similarities and differences of their life cycles (e.g., compare stages in the life cycles of a bee, a beetle, and a butterfly).

          101-7
          Observe and describe changes in the appearance and activity of an organism as it goes through its life cycle (e.g., draw and describe the stages in the life cycle of a frog, a butterfly or a worm; describe the movement and feeding behavior of a tadpole and the way it reacts to different things in its environment).

          102-7
          Describe features of natural and human-made environments that support the health and growth of some familiar animals (e.g., identify and describe features of a frog’s environment that enable it to meet its needs at different stages of its life cycle; replicate and care for a life-supporting environment such as an aquarium or terrarium).

          103-5
          Identify the basic food groups, and describe actions and decisions that support a healthy lifestyle (e.g., describe a healthy diet for daily meals and snacks, using the Canada Food Guide; describe actions that reduce the spread of germs; identify personal behaviors, such as nutritional choices that maintain good health).

          103-7
          Describe the effects of weather and ways to protect things under different conditions (e.g., describe changes in things that result from heat, cold, or dampness).

          Skills:

          Initiating and Planning:

          200-1
          Ask questions that lead to exploration and investigation (e.g., ask what caterpillars eat).

          200-3
          Make predictions based on observed pattern (e.g., predict that caterpillars eat leaves).

          200-4
          Select and use materials to carry out their own explorations (e.g., select and use a jar and a leafy branch as a home for a caterpillar).

          Performing and Recording:

          201-5
          Make and record relevant observations and measurements, using written language, pictures, and charts (e.g., observe what a caterpillar or worm eats and determine how much it eats each day).

          201-7
          Identify and use a variety of sources of science information and ideas (e.g., look through books and magazines to find out what happens when a caterpillar builds a cocoon).

          Analyzing and Interpreting:

          202-2
          Place materials and objects in a sequence or in groups according to one or more attributes (e.g., sort a set of animal pictures into adults and non-adults).

          202-7
          Propose an answer to an initial question or problem and draw simple conclusions based on observations or research (e.g., identify foods that caterpillars eat and do not eat).

          202-9
          Identify new questions that arise from what was learned (e.g., ask what butterflies eat).

          Communication and Teamwork:

          203-2
          Identify common objects and events, using terminology and language that others understand (e.g., describe the stages in the life of a butterfly as egg, caterpillar or larva, chrysalis, and butterfly or adult).

          203-3
          Communicate procedures and results, using drawings, demonstrations and written and oral descriptions (e.g., explain, using a model constructed of modeling clay and a tree branch, how a caterpillar feeds).

          203-5
          Respond to the ideas and actions of others and acknowledge their ideas and contributions (e.g., consider and respond to ideas for explaining why a caterpillar is not eating).
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